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I just wanted to let you all know that I have just updated my Home and School Solutions website. Among other things I added numerous links to all the section favourite link pages, brought the various testimonial (introduction) pages up-to-date, and fixed all the broken links.

The major thing I did, though, is add a Blogs-Plus tab/page. If there is anything I want to add to the website that cannot be naturally included in any of the existing sections (Hebrew Roots, Health=Wealth, Home Schooling, Faith Matters, Desktop Publishing, Store and Services, or About Home and School Solutions) then I will put it here.

Since most of my activity and research in recent years has been in the areas of prepping and gardening, I have put material about these two areas on the Blogs-Plus page. You are invited to go there now and check out all the links I have provided for you.

Have fun!

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100 Days of Prepping

Whooohooo. Kellene Bishop of Preparedness Pro has just announced she is doing a “100 Days of Prepping” series chockful of information in many different forms–videos, articles, books, forum, lists, etc.

Sometime during that period she will be unveiling her new cookbook, which I’ve been looking forward to for awhile because she believes in tasty food from her food stores, which is something I’ve been agonizing about, and since she is a very practical person I know these will be recipes I can really use.

Read all about it!

Have fun!

P.S. I don’t know what’s going to be included but I’m going to go out on a limb and assume the following categories will be mentioned somewhere in there. If not, please forgive me.

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Preparedness Pro Contest

Ack! I just went through all the articles to this point (1-76) to see how many times I’ve already voted and I’ve already shot my wad! Did so before I even wrote this article “Cause That’s What Preppers Do”! I should’ve prepped by not voting for anyone just-in-case! But people have been writing such great stuff, I couldn’t help myself!

Anyway, I can’t vote anymore so you are going to have to do it for me! The competition is stiff, folks. There’s somebody with 162 votes already! Another one has 102 votes! There are several in the 30 to 70 range, and many in the 10 to 29 range! So if you really would like me to win something great (and there are many things I’d really like to have–Big Berkey, Sun Oven, WonderMill, even the buckets or the Tattler Lids) you’re going to have to work at it! You can vote FIVE TIMES each, so please do. Others have gotten their families and friends on board and they’ve all voted five times each! If they can do it, you can do it. Helping each other is what preppers do! Many, many thanks to all of you.

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‘Cause That’s What Preppers Do”

I’m attempting to win an awesome prize at PreparednessPro. If you’d like to help, please read the article entitled “Cause That’s What Preppers Do” that I just posted there and vote. Your comment is your vote. Many thanks!

After that, please look around the website. Kellene Bishop is the Preparedness Pro and she’s on a mission!

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Discovering Sourdough

Posted on 18th November 2011 in Sourdough

I have discovered a gold mine and want to share it with you! Baking with sourdough will likely be an important skill to have when the economy falls apart and you cannot buy yeast at the store. My experiments with sourdough over the past several months have been largely focussed on simple items like bread, pancakes and English muffins that can be prepared quickly and easily–because I assume that’s all we’ll have time for in a survival situation.  Indeed, that’s all I’ve really had time for this year while gardening and preserving my harvest. I did not realize sourdough can be used for a much greater repertoire of items; nor did I realize there were so many “little” skills to have in order to have a truly successful sourdough.

Enter my discovery. While surfing the ‘net on another mission I happened upon a free e-book that explains everything a newbie like me and an experienced baker could possibly need to know about working with sourdough. Of course, there are lots of recipes. I’ve already learned enough from the first third of the book’s part 1 that I used up the last of my existing sourdough in pancakes yesterday and am going to create a fresh starter after the weekend. I’m so excited!

If you are ready for a sourdough upgrade, check out Discovering Sourdough by Teresa L. Hosier Greenway, who has generously put this extensive e-book online for free download at her Northwest Sourdough website. There is also a hydration converter. Bonus!

Check it out, download the e-book, print it off, and let me know what you think when you finally come up for air!

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Can you make your own yeast?

Posted on 28th March 2011 in Sourdough

Just read a very interesting article at Off the Grid News, and thought you would find it compelling as well. The article is called “Prepper Baking 101: Making Your Own Yeast.” Did you know you can make sourdough starter using crushed grapes or other fruit, like tomatoes? And use potato water to start and feed your starter? Or that you can dehydrate your starter so that you have some ready-to-use when you arrive at your bugout place?

One of the people who commented on the article also provided a link to a source of sourdough recipes made in a bread machine.

Do check it out!

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Sourdough on the Go

Posted on 28th September 2010 in Sourdough

Just a short note today, to post a link to a website that could possibly be very helpful as we make preparations for the future. I haven’t checked it out yet but the e-course looks very promising if the introductory video on the home page is any indication. Do check out what’s available for learning how to make and use sourdough.

When the children of Israel left Egypt they were in such a hurry they couldn’t let their bread rise, so they ate unleavened bread for awhile. This got me thinking. I bet in those days people didn’t have yeast like we keep in our refrigerators with which to make delectable breads and buns. If they had, they could have just brought it along and used it whenever they had a chance to rest a bit (assuming they also brought along some grains). I bet they used sourdough! We may have to depend on sourdough recipes if we want raised goods to eat at some point in the future, so this is an opportunity to get experience with sourdough and to collect recipes.

Speaking of unleavened bread, there are three collections of unleavened recipes on my website that you may wish to check out. I have not tried most of them, but really like the few I have–especially the Cheese Straws! If you try any of these recipes and would like to comment on them (particularly if they can be improved) please do so. I will be happy to edit those documents to make the recipes better. Also, if you have different unleavened recipes that you would like to add to the website, I will be glad to make a fourth collection and have it online before Passover.

I had no idea you could make sourdough chocolate cake…must check that out…

Connie

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